March 1, 2018

NSTU suspends job action

Following numerous compromises by the McNeil government, the NSTU will not pursue job action in response to legislation being introduced today.

“A college of teachers and a central department of evaluations would have created more unnecessary bureaucracy and would have drained resources from our schools. It is positive those ideas have been rejected,” says NSTU President Liette Doucet. “Similarly, a province-wide seniority list would place rural communities as risk, so we are pleased that concept is now being reconsidered.”

Doucet says the NSTU is still opposed to the legislation, which could do more harm than good to public education.

“The collegial model is badly damaged with the removal of administrators from our bargaining unit, and I fear this could bring more conflict to our schools. Similarly, I am genuinely fearful of the chaos that the elimination of English school boards will bring to the entire system. This approach has not served our health care system well,” she says.

Doucet wants to thank parents, students and community members for their overwhelming support in recent weeks. She says the powerful statement teachers made with their strike mandate helped raise awareness of the risks associated with the Glaze report.

“Teachers have been united in opposing changes outlined in the Glaze report, and their collective voice has begun to open the eyes and ears of government to the challenges our students are facing. We are well aware of the short-term impact a strike would have on families, and while the government has done enough to avert job action, they still have much more to do to improve our public education system. We will hold them accountable.”